Renovating Your Mind Shows Increase Risk Of Diabetes With Higher Intake Of Red Meat

Harvard University data utilized in a University of Singapore Study involved 150,000 health care professionals and their intake of red meat. This study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine online on 6/17/2013:

Changes In Red Meat Consumption And Subsequent Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

insulin-needles-diabetes

They found that over a 4 year trial, red meat was linked to higher incidence of Type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset). In fact, researchers observed 20 years of dietary data for these individuals. Scientists sliced the two decades by 4 year time periods. Next they analyzed the resulting health picture of the volunteers over five different intervals. An increase in red meat over 4 years increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by almost 50%. The increase averaged out to about half a serving size. A serving size resembles a deck of cards.

Renovating Your Mind has spoken about getting at least one day weekly into your dietary schedule where you consume meat-less meals. This study and others helps to show the way for cutting down on meat intake. If your budget allows, search for meat that is certified organic.

pork-uncooked-thick-bacon

Previous studies have shown similar results. In other research, red meat also had a significant impact on increasing both cancer and cardiovascular disease risk. Please refer to the 4/9/12 article from Archives Internal Medicine:

Red Meat Consumption And Mortality

This present trial is unique because of the long duration of the study. Earlier studies showed the same effect but over shorter periods of time. A 20 year study has more impact in regards to a “real effect” of dietary changes with regards to red meat.

It’s probably all about the fat and not the protein. Increasing amounts of excess stored fat negatively effects how cells react to hormones. One of these hormones is insulin. This faturated (my own word) insulin doesn’t work correctly because the body has too much stored fat. In time, the patient will need medication or insulin.

butchered-rabbit

There is also a problem with the animals. Industrialized non-organic animal farms are using all kinds of chemicals to treat their animals. Many end up in the meat. They are also raised packed together like sardines in a can. This spreads bacteria and possibly disease. Animals witness the screaming and the blood of those kin ahead in line. This increases adrenalin in the animal with those steroids at much higher levels than normal in the butchered meat. Think about being in line waiting to be killed and what would happen to your stress hormones, blood pressure and heart rate. We are consuming all that adrenalin when we cook that pretty packaged piece of meat.

All of these chemicals and fats lead to the abnormal hormonal interplay. Insulin does not work well to lower blood glucose levels. The pancreas, the organ that produces insulin, recognizes that blood sugar is still high. It starts pumping out more and more insulin to no avail. Ultimately, the pancreas will burn itself out producing insulin that works very poorly.

Excess fat in the body causes cells not to recognize insulin. Insulin is the doorman that allows your cells to open a portal to have glucose get inside the cell. If that door doesn’t get opened, glucose stays on the outside of the cell. Sugar levels build up and over time the abnormal condition becomes a disease called diabetes.

Don’t let this happen to you. Make some significant evolutionary changes in your diet. If you are diabetic, you can improve your situation by lowering your consumption of red meat. Everyone, myself included, can always change their diet and eat healthier. We become what we eat. Increase your chances for a healthy future by altering your diet today.

Photo credit: Foter.com / Public Domain Mark 1.0

Photo credit: clayirving / Foter.com / CC BY-ND

Photo credit: David Blackwell. / Foter.com / CC BY-ND



Categories: Food, Health, Nutrition

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: